Feeling at home

They say home is not a place, it’s a feeling; and, we’ve all grown to understand this idea with new depth after all the months in lockdown. Think about what you learned about finding little comforts, spending more time with your folk, simplicity and everyday joy. For us, that beautiful at-home mood is captured perfectly in these adorable kurtas made from Jaipur handblock printed handwoven cotton.

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Pure moods

What is pink? a rose is pink
By a fountain’s brink.
What is red? a poppy’s red
In its barley bed.
What is blue? the sky is blue
Where the clouds float thro’.
What is white? a swan is white
Sailing in the light.
What is yellow? pears are yellow,
Rich and ripe and mellow.
What is green? the grass is green,
With small flowers between.
What is violet? clouds are violet
In the summer twilight.
What is orange? Why, an orange,
Just an orange!

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For the love of kurtas

So simple, that its genius is invisible; so ubiquitous in eastern histories, that its exact roots are impossible to pinpoint; so functional, that its beauty deserves its own definition; the kurta is undoubtedly one of South Asia’s most recognised sartorial symbols. With its basic silhouette constructed upon the shape of the human torso, kurtas carry a degree of androgyny that lends well to all work settings. Kurtas are probably the most widely worn work outfit across the subcontinent. But, it is also much more than a staunch work garment. Like the saree, the kurta too has its many manifestations adding to a complex history. Thickly starched in cottons, it is the strong, durable uniform of the working woman or man; made in fine silks and adorned with embroidery, the kurta is a stylish, and culturally appropriate garment admitted to any formal occasion. In breezy cottons or linens, it is an indispensable part of the preferred at-home ensemble for many. A clean, crisp and well-pressed kurta upon a political stage is a statement of cultural dignity and authority with a definite nod to the working classes. These many layered sensibilities of the kurta and its profoundly uncomplicated beauty is precisely what draws Rithihi to curate an evolving collection of these beloved tunics.

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